View of Nassau in The Bahamas by N. Pocock

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View of Nassau in The Bahamas by N. Pocock

2,200.00

“N.Pocock Del. T.Medland sculp.”

Nicholas Pocock Delineat (original watercolorist) Thomas Medland Sculpsit (original engraver)

“Publish'd Dec.r. 2 1799 by Bunney & Gold.” (As at 1801 based in Shoe Lane, London). 

There was also another related company named Bunney Thompson & Company. 

Aquatint

Measurements:
Sight size:  5.5 x 9 inches (14 x 22.9 cm)
Frame dimensions: 13.625 x 17.25 inches (34.6 x 43.8 cm)

General Comments:  This finely crafted print, which was published in the Naval Chronicle (of which Gold was the founder and publisher), depicts a small schooner in the foreground anchored outside the entrance to Nassau (formerly Charles Town) Harbour, trailed by a small sailing vessel (possibly a pilot boat). In the background, a larger vessel can be viewed entering the harbour. British flags unfurled in the breeze can be seen on the schooner and spotted in the distant skyline above Fort Fincastle, Government House, and Fort Charlotte. Behind Hog Island (now Paradise Island) lie the ships' masts and buildings of the city of Nassau. Rare prints of this type, quality, and condition have become very difficult to locate in recent years. 


The Naval Chronicle, published in London between the years 1799 and 1818, was a monthly magazine with a reputation as the era’s most influential publication on maritime affairs, and is today recognized as a prime source for British maritime and military history. Initially published by John Bunney and Joyce Gold (after 1802 by Gold only), the magazine covered a wide range of subjects, including accounts of battles; notices of promotions, marriages, retirements, and deaths; lists of ships and their tonnages; reports of courts-marshal, shipwrecks, and privateering activities; updates on the latest technology; letters and biographies; and even poetry. Each volume, released semi-annually for a total of forty overall, also contains engravings and charts relating to naval engagements and important harbours. Original print copies of the magazine are today very rare and  primarily confined to major libraries.

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