Goode, George Brown: Signed letter from the Smithsonian scientist

oode, George Brown: Signed letter from the Smithsonian scientist
Goode, George Brown (1851–1896)
oode, George Brown: Signed letter from the Smithsonian scientist
Goode, George Brown (1851–1896)

Goode, George Brown: Signed letter from the Smithsonian scientist

410.00

Goode, George Brown (1851–1896)

Smithsonian scientist Goode thanking a naturalist for a specimen

George Brown Goode, American Ichthyologist who served as the assistant secretary in charge of National Museum [of Natural History] at the Smithsonian Institution. Typed letter signed. (“G. Brown Goode”). 2 pages. 4to. (approximately 7 ¾ x 9 ¾ inches) Washington, 4 September 1888. On Smithsonian Institution letterhead. To English shipbroker and naturalist Robert Morton Middleton, JR., F.L.S., F.Z.S. (1846–1909)

R. Morton Middleton Jr. Esq.,
Sewanee,
Tennessee.

Dear Sir:
Your letter of July 18, inclosing six fangs, extracted from the mouth of a rattlesnake, was duly received, and referred to our Curator of Reptiles. He has been absent during the greater part of the summer, and hence the delay in answering the question which you repeated in your note dated August 29.

It appears that it is not an uncommon occurrance [sic] for the rattlesnake to have more than one fang on each side. Rudimentary fangs are always in process of developing, and when one is lost by any means, another soon takes its place. In many cases, before a fang has been lost a new one appears at its side. One of our assistants in the Reptile Department says that he has seen three fangs on one side of the upper jaw, and two on the other, all well developed.

We shall take pleasure in answering any further questions which you may wish to ask, and will take care that no unnecessary delay shall occur in making reply.

Yours truly,
G. Brown Goode
Assistant Secretary

Goode was a trained ichthyologist who conducted fish research for the United States Fish Commission and the Smithsonian Institution starting in 1873. From 1887 to 1888 he was the U.S. Commissioner of Fish and Fisheries. He was also the author of numerous scientific books and articles including Catalogue of Bermuda Fishes in 1876 and Oceanic Ichthyology in 1895. Numerous species of fish are named for him.

The Smithsonian was established in 1846 by an act of Congress. It is the largest museum complex in the world.

Middleton was a British collector of natural specimens and a member of the British Linnean Zoological Society, who lived for a time in Tennessee, where he received our letter. He corresponded with many naturalists of his day, and, in 1890, he donated more than 3,000 specimens to McGill University. After returning to England in 1892, he was a Temporary Assistant at the Natural History Museum until his death.

Folded and in very good condition.

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