Red Umbrella, 1972 by Norman Lewis

Red Umbrella, 1972 by Norman Lewis
red umbrella resized.jpeg
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Red Umbrella, 1972 by Norman Lewis
red umbrella resized.jpeg
1003 JPEG.jpg

Red Umbrella, 1972 by Norman Lewis

11,600.00

Norman Lewis (1909-1979)

Original etching on paper printed in rust on a bluish-grey chine-collé.
Framed in a beautiful white gold leaf frame.

"This is Lewis's first color etching, created by forcing red printing ink into the etched lines, and rolling gray ink onto the stretched (called relief) surface.  Lewis's entire edition of impressions may have been sold during the artist's lifetime making it his most popular print.

There is also another etching of this image, in which Lewis tried black ink rather than gray on the relief surface. Color experiments such as this confirm that Lewis brought to his printmaking the same exploratory approach he engaged when working in other media." (This is an edited version of the text panel that appeared alongside this print hung at The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts exhibit "Procession: The Art of Norman Lewis," November 13, 2015 - April 03, 2016.)

Measurements:
Sight size: 11.75 x 15.75 in. (30 x 40 cm.)
Artwork (including border): 27.75 x 20 in. (70.5 x 50.8 cm.)

Signed, titled, dated, and numbered 22/25 in pencil, lower margin.

There is another impression in the David C. Driskell Collection, illustrated in Narratives of African-American Art and Identity, pl. 81, p. 148.

General Comments:
According to latest research (Procession The Art of Norman Lewis, edited by Ruth Fine, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 2015, p. 204): "Lewis was the middle son of Diana (originally Dinah) Cairnes Lewis and Wilfred N. Lewis, who traveled from their birthplace of St. Kitts through Bermuda in 1906." The book's endnote goes on to state: "Although Lewis told interlocutors that his parents were from Bermuda, records indicate that they were born in St. Kitts. See "Wilfred Lewis" and "Diana Lewis" in 1920 US Federal Census, in Ancestry.com, accessed October 3, 2014, at http://search.ancestry.com. 

In our opinion, what is clear is that Norman Lewis had a rich cultural heritage including St. Kitts, Bermuda and New York. It is not known whether he traveled back to Bermuda after 1909, but this is certainly a possibility.

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