Cummings, Eloise: Signed letter to Bermuda with original envelope

Cummings, Eloise: Signed letter to Bermuda with original envelope
A letter to a convalescent in Bermuda extolling the virtues of the island and discussing Upton Sinclair
Signed letter to Bermuda
Autograph letter signed from a wife to her husband, Robert A. Cummings
cummings_1908-02-27_letter_p2_p3.jpg
cummings_1908-02-27_letter_p5_p8.jpg
cummings_1908-02-27_letter-from-a-child_p1_p4.jpg
Cummings, Eloise: Signed letter to Bermuda with original envelope
A letter to a convalescent in Bermuda extolling the virtues of the island and discussing Upton Sinclair
Signed letter to Bermuda
Autograph letter signed from a wife to her husband, Robert A. Cummings
cummings_1908-02-27_letter_p2_p3.jpg
cummings_1908-02-27_letter_p5_p8.jpg
cummings_1908-02-27_letter-from-a-child_p1_p4.jpg

Cummings, Eloise: Signed letter to Bermuda with original envelope

110.00

Eloise Cummings

A letter to a convalescent in Bermuda extolling the virtues of the island and discussing Upton Sinclair

Autograph letter signed from a wife to her husband, Robert A. Cummings of Beaver, Pennsylvania. N.p. February 14–16, 1908. 8pp. Small 8vo. Sent via New York care of the Quebec Steamship Co. in Hamilton.

Scott #304 5c used stamp depicting Abraham Lincoln with letter:

My precious Robert: I thank you so much for the dear letter that came from my boydee to-day – the sweet kind of a valentine. I am so thankful to hear you are well and happy my loved one that happy land of sunshine and flowers. I hope those rheumatic fingers and joints have been healed in the warm sunshine and feel supple and natural as my boydee’s pretty fingers always are. Do not walk too far at a time – My love one I think ten miles is too long a walk – it does one more harm than good to fatigue oneself. I no [sic] shorter walks of five miles each will do far more good, and you would feel far better and more exhilarating effect afterwards. I am so thankful to hear you have gained eleven pounds – and hope you will gain seven more loved one. It was sweet of Mrs. Whitney to ask you to supper. Please give my love to her when you see her and the children send their love to Derit [?]. I thank you ever so much for the Bermuda papers: I read them with a great deal of pleasure, knowing my darling has read them too. As to your coming home, I would have as long a rest in Bermuda as you can while you are there, darling. It is scarcely safe to come north from Bermuda until after the middle of March. I remember we came away from Bermuda on March 20th and I felt the cold dreadfully afterwards, so I would not come north any earlier than March than you have to – not before the 17th of March at the earliest – it is really safer not to, on account of pneumonia and you need to rest my darling now while you can take it, before you settle down to hard work – real plodding again. Be good to yourself this time and take just as long a rest as you can while you are in Bermuda, for you always enjoy being there and it is an ideal place to rest, and there is a subtle charm about Bermuda – the longer one lingers the greater the inclination to linger on indefinitely. Have you seen Upton Sinclair’s place in Bermuda? When out on your rambles see what his place looks like. Please find out if Upton Sinclair the author is from Baltimore, as I used to know an “Upton Sinclair” when I was a young girl – he was a little child and lived near us. I do not imagine it could be the same person. Although it is the same name and an odd name too. The Upton Sinclair I knew was a grandson of Mr. Harden who was once Treasurer of the Western Maryland R[ail] R[oad], but I scarcely think it is the author – the little boy I knew. Saturday – February 15 It is snowing this evening and the river is rising owing to the warmer weather of Thursday, Friday and up to noon to-day. The people in Bridgewater are fearing another flood but I hope it will not materialize. The Five dollar table has arrived and the children and I are delighted with it, and we needed it very badly. It adds a great deal to the comfort and appearance of the sitting room. Sunday Feb. 16 – There is quite a flood in the river: the “dispatch” this morning said the 32 ft. mark would be reached this morning. The children went to Sunday School and I went over to church this morning: we had to get out and walk thru [?] places where the water was over the track: this made me late although I started in time, I did not reach church until the readings of the second lesson. Eloise sat with Margaret Davison in church: Helberta Torry (Eloise’s friend with long light hair) has been sick in bed with grippe for several weeks. Mr. Shulz asked me how you were and I told him you were away or else would be over at church. He preached a very earnest sermon this morning. I am sure he will do a great deal of good. I have been putting fifty cents in the church collection the past few Sundays. I wish you were not going to belong to the Dusquesne Club darling: I have always been so opposed to clubs, realizing they do anything but assist us in our journey Heavenwards. I would appreciate it so much if you would not join that club. I lay thinking about it during the night and again during the sermon’s plea for a useful, pure life. Let us take the money you would give to the club and five it to God’s cause instead, and spend more of our time together and not at clubs, Mr. Atwood does not belong to a club – but comes home at three or four o’clock every day and spends the time at his home and does not feel the need of a club’s diversion or temptation. I am sure you will agree with me boydee, for pure lives and happy ones are seldom the product of the fast-life & selfish life clubs produce. I have given up many things for your sake. I am sure you could do this darling for my sake. The thought of that club makes me unhappy for I want you all to myself to enjoy your leisure moments. Dear Papa Hadin [?] nor Mifflin never belonged to a club. Do you love me that much, darling? Devotedly, Eloise

American author Upton Sinclair retreated to Bermuda after the Utopian community he had built in 1906 was destroyed in a fire the following year. He retreated to Bermuda where he established a utopian community on a smaller scale. He spent the winter of 1907 of 1908 in Bermuda, writing and living out his socialist ideal. He was indeed from Baltimore and very likely the “little boy” Eloise Cummings knew as a girl. Mr. Harden was his paternal grandfather and his wealth made an impression on the boy who later became one of the century’s greatest advocates for social reform.

The Duquesne Club was a fraternal club in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania founded in 1873.

Folded and in very good condition. With the original envelope.

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